2020 New Breitling Limited Re-Edition

One of the most beautiful vintage-inspired Breitling pilot watches ever, the new AVI ref.765 1953 reprint has just been launched by the famous Swiss brand. Its tradition dates back to the original reference 765 AVI, introduced in 1953, and is known as the “copilot” because of its rotating bezels and oversized numbers, making it the perfect clock for professional pilots. The new AVI ref.765 Breitling comes in three limited-edition cases: stainless steel, 18-karat red gold, and platinum. The three cases represent a major upgrade for luxury while maintaining the aesthetic of the 1950s.
Breitling dipped deep into its archives for this one, going back to the original inspiration for the ref. 765 AVI that had a design rooted in the dashboard clocks designed and produced by the brand’s Huit Aviation Department. Established in 1938 to produce onboard chronographs for various aircraft, the Huit Aviation Department played an important role in cementing Breitling’s impeccable reputation and aviation heritage.
The stainless steel and 18k red gold variants feature black dials, with the red gold version limited to just 253 pieces. The platinum edition has a striking blue dial (our favorite among the options on offer) and of which only 153 examples will be made. Sized at 41.1 mm and powered by the Breitling Manufacture Caliber B09 manually-wound chronograph movement, only 1953 pieces of the new Breitling AVI ref. 765 Re-Edition will be made, and each will be inscribed with “ONE OF 1953” on its case back.
The AVI ref. 765 1953 Re-Edition is Breitling’s second-ever historical re-edition; no doubt they were encouraged by the success that the likes of Omega have had in this field. The first was the Navitimer ref. 806 1959 Re-Edition, which was launched last year and was met with success. Both re-edition models were painstakingly crafted to be as much like the originals as horologically possible.

“There are only two concessions that distinguish this new timepiece from its well-known ancestor,” Breitling notes of the new AVI ref. 765: “the water resistance has been improved to 3 bar compared to the original version, and keen-eyed observers will also see that “GENEVE” no longer appears on the dial.” However, “It was always clear to us that long-time Breitling fans would embrace these watches,” the brand’s CEO Georges Kern states. “But it’s also exciting to see how much they appeal to new users of our brand — they only have to look at the reprint to see how much fresh history, innovation, and cool luxury we’ve incorporated into the watch.”

Rolex Announces 2021 New Watch Releases

In April, Rolex announced it would delay the launch of its new watches until 2021 until further notice, saying it had no specific launch date. At that time, many speculated that we might not see any new fake Rolex watches in 2021. This announcement, coupled with the news from the previous month that Rolex was closing its factories and facilities to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, made it seem possible that Rolex might actually be delayed unveiling its new watches altogether. Read more on the Rolex Shortage. However, to the delight of collectors and enthusiasts, Rolex has just set a 2021 release date for its new watch.
This news comes as a major relief to lots of luxury watch collectors and enthusiasts, along with countless retailers around the globe who depend on Rolex models to account for a significant portion of their annual sales. Additionally, the cancellation of Baselworld and the delay in the unveiling of Rolex’s new 2021 replica watches have also resulted in an increased amount of speculation about what the brand is going to unveil.
In addition to there being no new Rolex watches for 2021 thus far, no models have been discontinued either. This has led to many collectors speculate about what Rolex might have planned for 2021. Besides that, given Rolex’s previous and rather vague statement from April, the news that we likely will see some new Rolex watches this year has sparked much excitement from countless individuals.
Despite Rolex now officially naming a date for the launch of its new 2021 watches, this is still not a guarantee that we – the public – will actually see new models in 2021 at all. What’s more, the announcement of any new watches and their actual real-world availability may be significantly different because of Rolex previously shutting down its factories earlier in the year.
Given that these September dates are being described as what will be a coordinated global launch, there is a great chance that the public will actually get some new 2021 Rolex models then. However, there are also two other scenarios to consider:
As the global coronavirus pandemic is not yet over, there is still a lot of uncertainty about whether a pandemic will occur later this year. The first week of September does still pose a risk for significant gatherings, and should global conditions worsen, there is an opportunity that Rolex’s new September launch, along with Geneva Watch Days will ultimately get postponed or canceled altogether.
So what does Rolex have decided for 2021? At this point in time – and likely right up until September 1st (and possibly even later) – only Rolex will know. Speculation among collectors and industry insiders has never been higher; But, whatever Rolex is released or stops in 2021, one thing is certain: it will almost certainly affect the open market price of some existing Rolex watches.

What Makes Rolex so Successful? Part III

When a man can’t get what he wants, his desire reaches its climax. Ever since the early days of Daytona appeared on the wrist of Hollywood star Paul Newman, the famous Daytona has been the object of desire for many. Rolex brought about many models into the store as it expected to sell. The result is long waiting lists. The search for the world’s most ideal watch only adds to the Rolex myth.


Rolex founder Hans Wilsdorf was a marketing genius. He chose a name that was easy to pronounce in a few different languages and made sure this name was printed on the dial – not totally common at a time when customer loyalty was to the dealer, not the manufacturer. Wilsdorf called his water-resistant watch the “Oyster” and gave a Rolex to a swimmer who planned to swim the English Channel.
The story landed him a full-page advertisement on the front page of the Daily Mail. There were also ads in magazines in which a young actress submerged her hand and wrist (and watch!) into a fishbowl. Rolex marketing approaches have a more subtle touch. Beginning in the late 1970s, it emphasizes its presence in prestigious sports such as tennis and golf, automobile racing, equestrian sports, and sailing.
Rolex always makes an unforgettable and composed impression. The company stays true to its proven methods and chooses to make continuous improvements rather than pursuing the new and different. Part of the brand’s mythology rests on the fact that fake Rolex did not jump on the quartz-watch bandwagon in the 1970s. The company does not produce complicated watches such as tourbillons or repeaters, only very rarely launches new collections, and stays away from online sales. New technologies such as silicone parts in its movements are developed very slowly and used very conservatively – smartwatches or “smart” features are unthinkable. This makes the brand predictable for the customer and also protects the brand from missteps.
The company does not make a big deal when introducing new products at Baselworld each spring. While other manufacturers boldly announce world records, hold press conferences featuring celebrities, or present 70 brand-new products, Rolex quietly works on detailed improvements. Larger cases, improved movements, ceramic bezels, and now and again a new color – even innovations such as these are discussed among replica Rolex fans hotly and not without controversy. When it comes to personal contact, Rolex tends to come across as mysterious, “like an Oyster” — from its watch-making facilities in Geneva to Biel’s machinery, which clients and journalists rarely see from the inside to the end of its chief executive, who usually does not give interviews.

watches

Pure Gold Rolex Submariner 1680

Actor, executive producer, writer, Justin Theroux wears many hats. He has also become a style icon, though he doesn’t stick to the tradition of leading menswear in high-end designer threads (though he seems to like replica watches). Instead, he likes the skinny black jeans and leather motorcycle gear he has worn since college.
While he has appeared on the cover of GQ – and countless supermarket tabloids courtesy of his more famous predecessor – we admire his bucking trend, most other Tinseltown types blindly follow. Theroux’s clothes were sometimes criticized for being stuck in the 1990s, but his watch game was so powerful that all other tailors’ sins could be forgiven.
Theroux (of course) is a Rolex fan and prefers vintage models, and again he chooses fake watches less popular but with no lack of cool. Take the 18k gold Submariner Ref. He was recently found wearing it in 1680. Solid gold sub-dials are kind of rare because the model’s most popular and collectible reference is stainless steel. But wavering is a strong statement.
Theroux’s Rolex replica watch is actually from the year he was born in 1971. Prices are in the $40,000 range and are hard to find. It’s very similar to gold 16618, and it will cost you half as much (and is a good buy), but it has more vintage feelings, such as a “nipple” dial and acrylic glass. The story goes that Theroux began hunting down submarines as a birthday gift to himself in 1971.
Theroux is also known for his sturdy gold Rolex date President, which isn’t the first watch you’d expect from someone with his style, but he’s doing pretty well. He also saw Audemars Piguet, Cartier, and IWC sports in various red-carpet shows and magazine features. But we suspect it comes from his personal collection. So what replica watches should Theroux be wearing? We highly recommend the 1955 Rolex Explorer II 1655 – this was the first year that the reference made its debut. The watch became known as the Steve McQueen, and although there was little evidence that the actor had worn it, it was still a relatively unpopular watch. Rolex uses some design cues for the 40th-anniversary edition, but classic retro references are certainly rarer.

Popular Apparel Trends Report in 2020

What is new and popular in the promotional field? Vantage Apparel’s director of sales, Lauren Cocco, Shared the latest trends, including fashion impact, key industry products, and new decor concepts.
Look for “versatile” or transitional items that can be worn all day and have multiple USES. These styles can have different looks and can easily range from casual to athletic to complex, depending on their style.
For instance, the same promotional quarter-zip pullover comes in a variety of styles: add a layer of Henley on top of a sweater for a casual look with jeans and sneakers; Pair a shirt with a button-down for a more upscale look;
Custom Lightweight pullovers, button-down shirts, and Henry shirts are great year-round and year-round options. These can be worn individually or in layers.
Like everyday wardrobes, customers are looking for comfort. Comfort is usually associated with comfortable cotton, softness, and stretch.
Many performance-based fabrics are blended with natural fibers or designed to have a cotton-like feel. Stacked jumpers and layered vests are a good example of this natural trend in the promotional field.
Spandex or stretch fabrics are also more popular — consider more elastic and less restrictive fabrics. Greg Norman Foreward polos are performance-based fabrics. These promotional polos are blended with cotton, ultra-soft to the touch, lightweight and breathable.

2018 Columbia Historic Preservation Society Exhibits

“Columbia Railroad” located in Banner Hall
“Tow Hill, freedom in the photographs”

Located in the original English Evangelical Lutheran Church, Columbia Historic Preservation Society is dedicated to the preservation of the river town, formerly known as Wright’s Ferry and Shawana Town. Once considered as a possible site for locating our nation’s capital, Columbia was once the gateway to the American West.

In addition to offering published articles and books on the town’s history, the museum houses a model train display, artifacts, a research room, microfilm archive, and publications pertaining to the history of this Susquehanna river town.

19-21 North Second Street
Columbia, Pennsylvania 17512

General inquiries can be directed to Christopher Vera.
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Contact information:

Christopher Vera
President
717.684.2894: Office
717.572.7149 : Cell
admin@columbiahistory.net

We have volunteer opportunities available and invite the public to assist in keeping CHiPS active and open to the public!

Monthly meetings are scheduled for every first Monday of the month at 7 PM.
We also have a Membership Meeting to elect new officers once a year on the second Sunday in April.

Columbia Historic Preservation Society is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

Columbia Rail History

The following written history and related facts were written by R. Ronald Reedy, Lititz Springs Park Historian; August 2002. It has been edited down slightly to only those facts most pertinent to Columbia. The complete text can be read at the source link found at the end of this post.
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The history of the Reading & Columbia Rail Road started with the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company chartered April 4, 1833, by an Act of the Pennsylvania Legislature. This is part of a complex story that began locally in 1857 with generated interest in a railroad between Reading and Columbia.

A group of influential citizens from Lancaster and Berks Counties secured passage of a charter creating the Reading & Columbia Rail Road Company which was signed by Governor James Pollock on May 19, 1857. By December 1860, the survey and location of the R&C route were completed. It was decided that Sinking Spring, where a connection could be made with the Lebanon Valley Railroad, would be the starting point and the line would run by the way of Reinholds, Stevens, Ephrata, Akron, Millway, Rothsville, Lititz, Manheim, Landisville, and onto Columbia—a distance of 39.8 miles. Although the major construction was started at the Columbia end of the line, the actual groundbreaking for the R&C was completed March 28, 1861, at a gap in the South Mountains about 4 miles south of Sinking Spring.

The first Lititz passenger depot and the express station were located on the north side of the tracks along Broad Street, which is the present site of Wilbur Chocolate Company. The depot was dedicated on December 26, 1863, with the arrival of the first passenger train.

Following the completion of the railroad between Columbia and Sinking Spring, a special train carrying officials and guests made the first trip from Columbia to Reading on March 15, 1864. A morning train from Reading, and an afternoon train from Columbia, inaugurated the first regular passenger train schedule between Columbia and Reading on April 1, 1864. Six passenger trains a day would stop at Lititz during their route to Reading or Columbia. Extra revenue was earned by the subsidized mail and railway express items that the trains carried.

By now, the Philadelphia & Reading Company, which operated the R&C, was merged with the Reading Company in 1923. The Reading Company assumed the operation of the Reading & Columbia Rail Road, but the R&C still retained its corporate existence. It was not until December 31, 1945, that the Reading & Columbia Rail Road Company was merged with the Reading Company after which the R&C as a corporate identity ceased to exist.

On April 1, 1976, the bankrupt Reading Company ceased being an operating railroad ending 143 years of railroading.
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A Few Related Facts:

The first railroad to reach Columbia, the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad, was part of the state-built Main Line of the Public Works of Pennsylvania. The 82-mile was completed in April 1834, but not officially opened until October 7, 1834.

The Pennsylvania Railroad appeared in the 1850s and quickly became a major industry in Columbia.

The Pennsylvania Legislature passed an act on April 13, 1846. incorporating the PRR and allowing it to build a line between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh.

In 1850 the company completed a line down the east shore of the Susquehanna River to Columbia and the P&C. On December 10, 1852, the first through train ran between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh using the P&C and PRR facilities.

The railroad soon took the business from the state-owned canal system, which ran parallel to the tracks, and in 1857 the canal system was purchased by the PRR. The purchase included the P&C line.

Baltimore’s interests started a railroad in the 1820s, the Baltimore and Susquehanna, to meet the Pennsylvania Public Works canal system. That new line made it to Wrightsville in 1840 and to cross the river to Columbia, the railroad laid tracks on the bridge which was built in 1834.

That bridge was burned in 1863 to prevent Confederate forces from crossing the river and trains did not cross the river again until 1869 when the Columbia Bridge Co. built a replacement covered bridge. The PRR bought the Wrightsville, York, and Gettysburg line in 1870 and the bridge in 1879.

The PRR expanded rapidly in the 1870s. The railroad station was relocated from the Washington House, at Front and Walnut Streets, to its present site on the opposite corner of the same intersection; and in 1872 saw the construction of a 360-degree roundhouse north of the present Bridge Street.

Soon the PRR had three yards in town: No. 1 or the East Yard, on the old P&C line near Fourth and Manor Streets, had a 13-stall, 180-degree roundhouse; No. 2 was on the Columbia & Port Deposit line and ran parallel to front Street; and No. 3 was west of Second Street, north of Bridge Street. It contained a major shop complex, coaling facility and water reservoir, and a 360-degree roundhouse.

When an 1896 hurricane destroyed the bridge over the river, the PRR had a replacement assembled in 21 days on the old piers a year later. This was one of the first prefabricated structures built in the United States. Originally the railroad intended the bridge to have two decks, the lower for trains and the upper for other traffic. The top deck was never added and cars and trains shared the planked lower deck until the Rt. 462 bridge was completed in 1930.

During 1904-1906 the PRR built the Atglen and Susquehanna Branch, a double-track railroad that ran parallel to the Main Line from Parkesburg, PA, to a new yard at Enola on the west side of the river, opposite Harrisburg. When the Enola yard opened the PRR moved many jobs there thus decreasing the workforce at the Columbia shops, roundhouse, and yards.

During the Depression of 1938, the PRR electrified the Columbia Branch, from Columbia to Lancaster, the A & S, and the C & PD lines. This came at the right time since World War II would soon break out, and without electrification, it was doubtful that the PRR could have handled the freight that it did through the town.

At one time the PRR ran passenger trains in four directions from Columbia: east-west between Lancaster and York, north to Middletown, and south to Perryville, MD.

But the hard times in the 1930s stopped service to Middletown on November 29, 1931, and Perryville on April 15, 1935; and when east-west runs ended on January 4, 1954, the railroad was using a single gas-electric car often called a “Doodlebug” between Lancaster and York.

In the early 1970’s Amtrak, the National rail passenger corporation ran passenger trains between Washington and Harrisburg through Columbia but they did not stop at Columbia.

From the Civil War to the turn of the century the Shawnee Furnace refined iron ore at Fifth and Union Street, near the Shawnee Creek; and ran its own transportation system-the Shawnee Railroad. Much of the railroad ran near the creek where the engines hauled cars loaded with finished products and waste.

In 1857 the Pennsylvania General Assembly approved an act incorporating the Reading and Columbia Railroad Co. The railroad was to run from Columbia to connect with the Lebanon Valley Railroad between Sinking Spring and Reading.

Construction crews completed the company’s first division, Columbia to Manheim, by January 1, 1862, but a labor shortage during the Civil War delayed a connection with the Lebanon Valley company until March 31, 1864.

By 1866, the R&C had its passenger station in Carpet Hall, at Front and Locust Streets; but by the 1880s passenger, the business had grown enough that a new passenger station was built at the same site. Designed by noted Philadelphia architect, Frank Furness, the two-story structure combined “Queen Anne” and “Eastlake” styles with company offices on the second floor, while spacious waiting rooms and a large open fireplace with a Minton tile hearth were on the first floor where passengers boarded trains under a protective train shed.

The P&R reorganized in 1896 as the Reading Company, and passengers from Columbia found the company had numerous trains to other towns on its line. For example on weekdays, in 1923, three trains ran from Columbia and three to the town; at Manheim, passengers could make connections to Lebanon, and at Reading, passengers could board trains to Shamokin, Philadelphia, and New York City.

Model Train Village

The Columbia Historic Preservation Society Model HO Model Railroad covers 1000 square feet and is HO (1:87) scale. The picture above is located in the Columbia area of the layout. The Columbia area is prototypical (based on what actually existed). The time era of Columbia is 1920-1940. Columbia covers approximately 200 sq. ft. of the layout, and is home to a large roundhouse facility, a major yard, coaling, and diesel facilities as well as two railroad stations (Pennsylvania RR and Reading RR).

A Brief History of the LayoutCHPS Train Display 3
The layout started in the basement of Jack Belsinger, a Lancaster, PA man. Being from Europe, he modeled European trains. He gave the layout to Calvin Duncan who worked to find a home for it. The layout was smaller than what it is today. In 1993, CHiPS agreed to take the layout. It was cut into pieces and stored on the unused second floor of the history museum. In 1998, work began on preparing the unused second floor, and the layout was reconstructed.

In 2000, it was decided to build an HO diorama of Columbia as it appeared in the first half of the 20th century. Since 2000, all the track was replaced, and Digital Command Control (DCC) was installed, replacing the Zero-1 System. Two-foot-high backdrops were constructed to isolate various scenes and to direct visitors up and down aisles around the layout. The layout is an ongoing work in progress.

Roland Zimmerman and his family visited the layout during the open houses. He shot the video below and added the guitar music. He permitted us to add the video to our website.

Roland Zimmerman’s Video (2013)What’s Happening So Far in 2016
We were given a 24 ft. x 10 ft. HO layout by a man in nearby Landisville. Over a period of 2 weeks (3 evenings a week), seven of us dismantled the layout into eight sections. One of our group obtained a moving van, and in one evening six “muscle guys” moved the sections from Landisville to the training room at CHPS. Most of this layout will be part of the layout expansion project. The layout includes several buildings, all the track and switch machines, an 18-stall scratch-built roundhouse, and an operating turntable. We purchased the turntable system and four Digitrax boosters. Also, lots of trees.