2020 New Breitling Limited Re-Edition

One of the most beautiful vintage-inspired Breitling pilot watches ever, the new AVI ref.765 1953 reprint has just been launched by the famous Swiss brand. Its tradition dates back to the original reference 765 AVI, introduced in 1953, and is known as the “copilot” because of its rotating bezels and oversized numbers, making it the perfect clock for professional pilots. The new AVI ref.765 Breitling comes in three limited-edition cases: stainless steel, 18-karat red gold, and platinum. The three cases represent a major upgrade for luxury while maintaining the aesthetic of the 1950s.
Breitling dipped deep into its archives for this one, going back to the original inspiration for the ref. 765 AVI that had a design rooted in the dashboard clocks designed and produced by the brand’s Huit Aviation Department. Established in 1938 to produce onboard chronographs for various aircraft, the Huit Aviation Department played an important role in cementing Breitling’s impeccable reputation and aviation heritage.
The stainless steel and 18k red gold variants feature black dials, with the red gold version limited to just 253 pieces. The platinum edition has a striking blue dial (our favorite among the options on offer) and of which only 153 examples will be made. Sized at 41.1 mm and powered by the Breitling Manufacture Caliber B09 manually-wound chronograph movement, only 1953 pieces of the new Breitling AVI ref. 765 Re-Edition will be made, and each will be inscribed with “ONE OF 1953” on its case back.
The AVI ref. 765 1953 Re-Edition is Breitling’s second-ever historical re-edition; no doubt they were encouraged by the success that the likes of Omega have had in this field. The first was the Navitimer ref. 806 1959 Re-Edition, which was launched last year and was met with success. Both re-edition models were painstakingly crafted to be as much like the originals as horologically possible.

“There are only two concessions that distinguish this new timepiece from its well-known ancestor,” Breitling notes of the new AVI ref. 765: “the water resistance has been improved to 3 bar compared to the original version, and keen-eyed observers will also see that “GENEVE” no longer appears on the dial.” However, “It was always clear to us that long-time Breitling fans would embrace these watches,” the brand’s CEO Georges Kern states. “But it’s also exciting to see how much they appeal to new users of our brand — they only have to look at the reprint to see how much fresh history, innovation, and cool luxury we’ve incorporated into the watch.”

Rolex Announces 2021 New Watch Releases

In April, Rolex announced it would delay the launch of its new watches until 2021 until further notice, saying it had no specific launch date. At that time, many speculated that we might not see any new fake Rolex watches in 2021. This announcement, coupled with the news from the previous month that Rolex was closing its factories and facilities to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, made it seem possible that Rolex might actually be delayed unveiling its new watches altogether. Read more on the Rolex Shortage. However, to the delight of collectors and enthusiasts, Rolex has just set a 2021 release date for its new watch.
This news comes as a major relief to lots of luxury watch collectors and enthusiasts, along with countless retailers around the globe who depend on Rolex models to account for a significant portion of their annual sales. Additionally, the cancellation of Baselworld and the delay in the unveiling of Rolex’s new 2021 replica watches have also resulted in an increased amount of speculation about what the brand is going to unveil.
In addition to there being no new Rolex watches for 2021 thus far, no models have been discontinued either. This has led to many collectors speculate about what Rolex might have planned for 2021. Besides that, given Rolex’s previous and rather vague statement from April, the news that we likely will see some new Rolex watches this year has sparked much excitement from countless individuals.
Despite Rolex now officially naming a date for the launch of its new 2021 watches, this is still not a guarantee that we – the public – will actually see new models in 2021 at all. What’s more, the announcement of any new watches and their actual real-world availability may be significantly different because of Rolex previously shutting down its factories earlier in the year.
Given that these September dates are being described as what will be a coordinated global launch, there is a great chance that the public will actually get some new 2021 Rolex models then. However, there are also two other scenarios to consider:
As the global coronavirus pandemic is not yet over, there is still a lot of uncertainty about whether a pandemic will occur later this year. The first week of September does still pose a risk for significant gatherings, and should global conditions worsen, there is an opportunity that Rolex’s new September launch, along with Geneva Watch Days will ultimately get postponed or canceled altogether.
So what does Rolex have decided for 2021? At this point in time – and likely right up until September 1st (and possibly even later) – only Rolex will know. Speculation among collectors and industry insiders has never been higher; But, whatever Rolex is released or stops in 2021, one thing is certain: it will almost certainly affect the open market price of some existing Rolex watches.

What Makes Rolex so Successful? Part III

When a man can’t get what he wants, his desire reaches its climax. Ever since the early days of Daytona appeared on the wrist of Hollywood star Paul Newman, the famous Daytona has been the object of desire for many. Rolex brought about many models into the store as it expected to sell. The result is long waiting lists. The search for the world’s most ideal watch only adds to the Rolex myth.


Rolex founder Hans Wilsdorf was a marketing genius. He chose a name that was easy to pronounce in a few different languages and made sure this name was printed on the dial – not totally common at a time when customer loyalty was to the dealer, not the manufacturer. Wilsdorf called his water-resistant watch the “Oyster” and gave a Rolex to a swimmer who planned to swim the English Channel.
The story landed him a full-page advertisement on the front page of the Daily Mail. There were also ads in magazines in which a young actress submerged her hand and wrist (and watch!) into a fishbowl. Rolex marketing approaches have a more subtle touch. Beginning in the late 1970s, it emphasizes its presence in prestigious sports such as tennis and golf, automobile racing, equestrian sports, and sailing.
Rolex always makes an unforgettable and composed impression. The company stays true to its proven methods and chooses to make continuous improvements rather than pursuing the new and different. Part of the brand’s mythology rests on the fact that fake Rolex did not jump on the quartz-watch bandwagon in the 1970s. The company does not produce complicated watches such as tourbillons or repeaters, only very rarely launches new collections, and stays away from online sales. New technologies such as silicone parts in its movements are developed very slowly and used very conservatively – smartwatches or “smart” features are unthinkable. This makes the brand predictable for the customer and also protects the brand from missteps.
The company does not make a big deal when introducing new products at Baselworld each spring. While other manufacturers boldly announce world records, hold press conferences featuring celebrities, or present 70 brand-new products, Rolex quietly works on detailed improvements. Larger cases, improved movements, ceramic bezels, and now and again a new color – even innovations such as these are discussed among replica Rolex fans hotly and not without controversy. When it comes to personal contact, Rolex tends to come across as mysterious, “like an Oyster” — from its watch-making facilities in Geneva to Biel’s machinery, which clients and journalists rarely see from the inside to the end of its chief executive, who usually does not give interviews.